International Seminar Series on Programmable Materials

virtual events in Summer 2021

International Seminar Series on Programmable Materials

International Seminar  /  June 10, 2021

Adaptive pre-programmed, interactive plant material systems and structures as models for novel technical developments

Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck, University of Freiburg, Germany

Location

Online via MS Teams

Date

Adaptive pre-programmed, interactive plant material systems and structures as models for novel technical developments Thursday, 10 June 2021, 3 - 4.30 p.m. (CEST)

Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck, University of Freiburg, Germany (webpage)

While interactive programmable material systems represent one of the major challenges in materials research, such material systems are widespread in biology. A good example is the group of lianas. While old liana stems are extremely flexible in bending and torsion and can thus passively follow the movements of their host trees, young liana axes are very rigid in bending and torsion and outperform tree branches
of the same diameter by a factor of three to five. The reason for this is that the young axes, known as »searcher twigs«, have to span in a self-supporting manner the distance to a new host tree, which often amounts to several meters. The structural basis of this high bending and torsional stiffness is the extremely dense and mechanically extremely stiff wood of young liana axes. Often these searcher stems additionally intertwine and for braid-like structure of two to five stems and by this »structurally« increase the axial second moment of area with little material invest. As soon as the searcher twigs have anchored themselves to a new host structure, the type of wood they built is »reprogrammed« and a structurally completely different, mechanically very flexible type of wood is formed. Material systems in the axes of lianas are excellent examples of highly adaptive (self-)programmed, interactive biological material systems, in which complex structural and mechanical changes occur interactively, triggered by various environmental stimuli (e.g. presence of a supporting host structure or not). They are excellent concept generators for the development of bio-inspired technically programmable and interactive materials systems.

Other examples are nastic movements which are based on pre-programmed material properties as hygroscopically actuated multiphase motions with often complex motion patterns. These movements are pre-programmed in many plant organs as conifer cone scales, involucral bracts of silver thistle, peristome teeth of some mosses or in the traps of carnivorous plants. The latter, as e.g. Venus flytrap or watertrap, show some of the most complex behaviours on the organismic level which functions without a central control unit, e.g. without a brain. Special emphasis in our studies is laid on embodied energy and »intelligence« found in moving plant organs, which offer a huge potential for a new generation of materials systems for soft robots as well as for bioinspired architecture and technical applications in general. Such materials systems are major field of research within the Cluster of Excellence Living, Adaptive and Energy-autonomous Materials Systems (livMatS) and the Plant Biomechanics Group Freiburg.

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International Seminar  /  July 01, 2021

Programmable Nanostructures by Directed Self-assembly of Block Copolymers

Prof. Caroline A. Ross, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Location

Online via MS Teams

Date

Programmable Nanostructures by Directed Self-assembly of Block Copolymers Thursday, 01 July 2021, 3 - 4.30 p.m. (CEST)

Prof. Caroline A. Ross, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA (webpage)

Block copolymers microphase separate to form periodic patterns with features of a few nm and above. The self-assembled nanostructures adopt a variety of bulk geometries, including alternating lamellae, gyroids, arrays of cylinders or spheres, tiling patterns, or core–shell structures, depending on the molecular architecture of the polymer and the volume fraction of its blocks, making them attractive materials for nanofabrication and nanolithography. A diverse range of 2D and 3D geometries can be created by directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on substrates patterned with topographical or chemical features, and the orientation of the microdomains can be controlled by solvent annealing and by engineering the top surface of the film. This presentation will describe strategies for templating thin films of diblock copolymers, triblock terpolymers, and bottlebrush copolymers to form both periodic and aperiodic features in 2D and 3D, combined with solvent annealing to generate non-bulk morphologies. We will demonstrate how these block copolymer patterns can be functionalized with metals and oxides and used to make magnetic nanostructures, nanowires and superhydrophobic surfaces.

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International Seminar  /  September 02, 2021

How the stereolithography technique can revolutionize the design of Soft Polymeric Materials for Multiple Purposes

Ph.D. Jean-Marie Raquez, Université de Mons, Belgium

Location

Online via MS Teams

Date

September 02, 2021

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How the stereolithography technique can revolutionize the design of Soft Polymeric Materials for Multiple Purposes Thursday, 2 September 2021, 1 - 2.30 p.m. (CEST)

Ph.D. Jean-Marie Raquez, Université de Mons, Belgium (webpage)

Slowly yet steadily, additive manufacturing technologies have become a major player in the fabrication of polymeric devices with controlled architectures such as personalized prototypes, soft electronics, sensors and actuators as well as tissue and biomedical engineering. Based on a layer by layer fabrication, with resolution in the range of micro- to nanometers per layer, the computer-assisted printing significantly speeds up the development of custom 3D devices without actually inflating the costs. Despite the irrefutable progress made around 3D printing, the technique still suffers from rigid and static properties of the printed parts and lack of fabrication approaches controlling the material anisotropy. In light of these limitations, a breakthrough strategy towards designing anisotropy-encoded structures using commercial stereolithography technology is reported by means of controlling either the specific surface area to volume ratio, the crosslinking density or the chemical composition of discrete layers during fabrication. The key element here is the time, where the actuation, the sensing and the programmability are directly embedded into the material structure and occur in desired time frames. More precisely, we address the challenge of building more complex 3D objects with elevated adaptive properties towards the 3D-printing of e.g. multi-responsive actuators, piezoionic touch sensors and rapid responsive visible indicators. This work represents a flexible platform for designing more advanced 3D-printed polymeric materials beyond the present study that would promote new potential applications.

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Programme

DATE sPEAKER tOPIC / Title Join Meeting
Thursday, 20 May 2021, 4 - 5.30 p.m. (CEST) Prof. Dr. Dr.h.c. Peter Fratzl, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, Germany (webpage Local fibre orientations control the behaviour of biological materials The talk has already taken place.
Thursday, 10 June 2021, 3 - 4.30 p.m. (CEST) Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck, University of Freiburg, Germany (webpage) Adaptive pre-programmed, interactive plant material systems and structures as models for novel technical developments Click here
(Link to MS Teams meeting)
Thursday, 01 July 2021, 3 - 4.30 p.m. (CEST) Prof. Caroline A. Ross, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA (webpage) Programmable Nanostructures by Directed Self-assembly of Block Copolymers Click here
(Link to MS Teams meeting)
Thursday, 2 September 2021, 1 - 2.30 p.m. (CEST) Ph.D. Jean-Marie Raquez, Université de Mons, Belgium (webpage) How the stereolithography technique can revolutionize the design of Soft Polymeric Materials for Multiple Purposes Click here
(Link to MS Teams meeting)

Agenda

 

  • Welcome and short introduction by member of Fraunhofer CPM (c. 10 minutes)
  • Talk (c. 45 minutes)
  • Discussion (c. 35 minutes)

You are invited to take actively take part in the discussion. Please note that the talk itself will be recorded and made publicly available afterwards at our website.

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Programmable materials are materials or material compositions, which are structured such that their properties can be specifically controlled and reversibly changed. Complex and locally different functions can be programmed into these materials.

Depending on the application and situation, the material then adopts different conditions and material properties initiated by external triggers.

 

Programmed = fixed functionality programmed into material during fabrication

Programmable = adaption of function during application

 

Programmable materials introduce a unique potential for new system solutions because they themselves adopt important system functionalities, thus making additional system components such as sensors or actuators redundant.

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Prof. Dr. Alexander Böker

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Prof. Dr. Chris Eberl

 

Scientific Coordinator of Fraunhofer CPM

Deputy Director of Fraunhofer IWM

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